We are dedicated to the study of artificial intelligence, security order, and radicalisation as present manifestations of future challenges

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Periculum

Events

  • The Security Sector Symposium

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    The Security Sector Symposium is a new collaborative effort among Charles University, the University of Glasgow, Dublin City University, the University of Trento, and OTH Regensburg. The Symposium brings together Security Studies students and professionals to foster the students’ career development. The event aims to furnish the student participants with experience and practical knowledge so as to facilitate their successful joining of the security industry.

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  • Periculum Staff Workshop – Environment and Security: Implications for Artificial Intelligene

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    How can we as a programme and as organisations, respectively, continue to better train students today in the requirements of security, including developing their skills, knowledge and experience, as well as provide better links between academia and industry.

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  • Masterclass Gender Implications of the Digital Revolution by prof. Judy Wajcman

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    We are now said to be in the “fourth industrial revolution”, the era of smart phones, big data, the internet of things, robotics and Artificial Intelligence, whereas when she began untangling the relationship between gender and technology, her main research preoccupation was how the microelectronic revolution would affect women. Then, as now, there were claims that new technologies would fundamentally transform gender relations – with either utopian or dystopian futures envisaged. Will digitalization lead to new forms of exclusion, as well as new opportunities for women? The masterclass will take stock of what we can learn from the earlier analysis of the gender relations of technoscience and its relevance for today.

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  • Silicon Valley’s Quest for Temporal Optimization by prof. Judy Wajcman

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    There is a widespread assumption that digital technologies are radically altering our perception of time: that we live too fast, that time is scarce and that the pace of everyday life is accelerating beyond our control. The iconic image that abounds is that of the frenetic, technologically tethered, iPhone-addicted citizen. Paradoxically, digital devices are seen as both the cause of time pressure as well as the solution. This talk will argue that while there is no temporal logic inherent in technologies, artifacts do play a central role in the constitution of time regimes. We make time with machines. I will illustrate this argument by exploring the vision of ‘intelligent’ time management that drives the design of digital calendars. Drawing on interviews with software engineers, I will argue that the shift from print to electronic calendars embodies a longstanding belief that technology can be profitably employed to control and manage time. This belief continues to animate contemporary sociotechnical imaginaries of what automation will deliver. In the current moment, calendars are increasingly conceived of as digital assistants whose behavioural algorithms can solve life’s existential problem – how best to organise the time of our lives. In sum, the aim here is to contribute to science & technology studies (STS) scholarship on the role of technology in shaping people’s experience of time.

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Studies

  • Autonomous Weapon Systems (AWS), The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

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    by Anzhelika Solovyeva & Nik Hynek - This chapter comprehensively defines autonomous weapon systems (AWS), discusses their military utility and strategic importance, as well as draws attention to related normative and legal considerations.

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  • Operations of Power in Autonomous Weapon Systems: Ethical Conditions and Socio‐Political Prospects

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    By Nik Hynek & Anzhelika Solovyeva - The purpose of this article is to provide a multi-perspective examination of one of the most important contemporary security issues: weaponized, and especially lethal, artificial intelligence.

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  • What Can Artificial Intelligence Do for Scientific Realism?

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    The paper proposes a synthesis between human scientists and artificial representation learning models as a way of augmenting epistemic warrants of realist theories against various anti-realist attempts.

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  • The Future of Human-Artificial Intelligence Nexus and its Environmental Costs

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    The environmental costs and energy constraints have become emerging issues for the future development of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI). So far, the discussion on environmental impacts of ML/AI lacks a perspective reaching beyond quantitative measurements of the energy-related research costs. Building on the foundations laid down by Schwartz et al. (2019) in the GreenAI initiative, our argument considers two interlinked phenomena, the gratuitous generalisation capability and the future where ML/AI performs the majority of quantifiable inductive inferences. The gratuitous generalisation capability refers to a discrepancy between the cognitive demands of a task to be accomplished and the performance (accuracy) of a used ML/AI model. If the latter exceeds the former because the model was optimised to achieve the best possible accuracy, it becomes inefficient and its operation harmful to the environment. The future dominated by the non-anthropic induction describes a use of ML/AI so all-pervasive that most of the inductive inferences become furnished by ML/AI generalisations. The paper argues that the present debate deserves an expansion connecting the environmental costs of research and ineffective ML/AI uses (the issue of gratuitous generalisation capability) with the (near) future marked by the all-pervasive Human-Artificial Intelligence Nexus.

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Projects

The centre’s research activities fall into three categories comprising artificial intelligence, security order, and radicalisation together conceived as present manifestations of future challenges

Artificial Inteligence

The centre’s research project on Artificial Intelligence (AI) pursues synthesising machine learning research with philosophical expositions related to AI.

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Security Order

The centre’s research project  on security order aims to ascertain impacts of recent technological innovations on the social realm in connections to security governance and management.

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Radicalization

The centre’s research project on radicalisation focuses on the micro-dynamic of violence in general and radicalization in particular.

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Research

Publishing our research on artificial intelligence, security order, and radicalisation to share our views on the present manifestations of future challenges

Most recent study

Autonomous Weapon Systems (AWS), The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

by Anzhelika Solovyeva & Nik Hynek - This chapter comprehensively defines autonomous weapon systems (AWS), discusses their military utility and strategic importance, as well as draws attention to related normative and legal considerations.

Read more

Teaching

Bringing our research on present manifestations of future challenges to our programs

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Blog

Popularising research on present manifestations of future challenges

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Opportunities

Searching for collaborators researching present manifestations of future challenges

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