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Global AI Narratives: Central and Eastern Europe

The Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge and the Department of Security Studies at Charles University are delighted to announce a series of three workshops focusing on AI narratives in Central and Eastern Europe, including the Jewish imaginary, Eastern European science fiction, and the contemporary perceptions of AI in the region.
Date: 4/10/2020

The Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence at the University of Cambridge and the Department of Security Studies at Charles University are delighted to announce a series of three workshops focusing on AI narratives in Central and Eastern Europe, including the Jewish imaginary, Eastern European science fiction, and the contemporary perceptions of AI in the region.

Funded by DeepMind Ethics and Society and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, Inc., the Global AI Narratives Project aims to establish new connections between academics, artists, writers, designers and technologists working on AI in different regions of the world. You can learn more about the larger project here.

Periculum will be the host of this workshop. The underlying project Human-Machine Nexus and the Implications for the International Order has won the status of Charles University’s Centre of Excellence. The main function of the hub is to cultivate and reinforce internationally relevant and successful post-doctoral research in the areas of artificial intelligence, security order and radicalisation. As a way of reflecting the notion of Human-Machine Nexus the project’s research on artificial intelligence involves also a methodological pivot towards applying machine learning to study security phenomena. Read more about Periculum and AI.

Global AI Narratives: Central and Eastern Europe will consist of the following workshops:

  • ‘An Epoch of Golem-Making’: Artificial Intelligence and the Jewish Imaginary (12 November 2020). To find out more about the program and to register, click here.

  • From Čapek to Lem: AI in Eastern European Science Fiction (January 2021, details TBD)

  • AI in Central and Eastern Europe: Contemporary Perceptions (May 2021, details TBD